Actuate

ac·tu·ate

tr.v. ac·tu·at·edac·tu·at·ingac·tu·ates

1. To put into motion or action; activate

2. To move to action

Actuate is a subcategory I’m creating under The Ray Bradbury School of Creative Arts

This is where my personalized education begins. When I was unsure about how to start my education into the arts I was visited by a voice, my muse or maybe just an idea. The idea was to learn from the artists I love; poets, painters, illustrators, writers, film makers, anyone who inspires me.

Tomorrow is my birthday and my first day of school at RBSCA. When I closed my eyes and asked for my first assignment The Ghost of Richard Brautigan came to me. He had visited me earlier this year when I was cleaning my Gothic Bathroom, he was wanting to do a project together.

I remembered buying a broken alarm clock at a garage sale this last summer. I bought it because The Ghost of Richard Brautigan wanted me too. Actually, I didn’t have to buy it. We bought an autoharp from an old woman there and she threw the broken alarm clock in for free after I had been carrying it around her garage sale for about twenty minutes.

Richard Brautigan

Here is Richard’s contribution to my first assignment. It is an excerpt taken from a Chapter titled: The Watermelon Sun from his novella In Watermelon Sugar:

“Today would be a day of gray watermelons. I like best tomorrow: the black, soundless watermelon days. When you cut them they make no noise and taste very sweet.

They are good for making things that have no sound. I remember there was a man who used to make clocks from the black, soundless watermelons and his clocks were silent. The man made six or seven clocks and then he died. There is one of the clocks hanging over his grave. It is hanging from the branches of an apple tree and sways in the winds that go up and down the river. It of course does not keep time anymore.”

Richard Brautigan 1964

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